May 18, 2007

Bible and Spade Articles

I took this photo while on a trip in June 2004 with the University of New Brunswick Classics department. I had submitted it for use in an article for the magazine and was pleased it made the front cover. The Trajaneum in Pergamum, modern Bergama, Turkey. It was used for emperor worship. Emperor Trajan (AD 98-117) started the project and it was enlarged and completed by Hadrian (AD 117-138). In Smyrna, modern Izmir, Turkey, an earlier temple to Tiberius (AD 14-37) may have been similar in style. Excavated in the 1880's the Trajaneum was restored a century later in the mid-1990's by the German Archaeological Institute. I originally took the photo because of the white marble face overlaid on the stone block foundation. It was a good illustration of the facing that was used to polish the appearance of a building. This also shows a good example of a Corinthian capital.

For further information on Smyrna and the imperial cult see my four articles in the Bible and Spade magazine 2005-2006.

  • Local References in the Letter to Smyrna (Rv 2: 8–11), Part 4: Religious Background,” Bible and Spade 19.3 (Summer 2006): 88–96.
  • “Local References in the Letter to Smyrna (Rv 2: 8–11), Part 3: Jewish Background,” Bible and Spade 19.2 (Spring 2006): 41–47.
  • “Local References in the Letter to Smyrna (Rv 2: 8–11), Part 2: Historical Background,” Bible and Spade 19.1 (Winter 2006): 23–31.
  • “Local References in the Letter to Smyrna (Rv 2: 8–11), Part 1: Archaeological Background,” Bible and Spade 18.4 (Fall 2005): 114–23.

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